Access to Disability Data

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Accessibility

Accessible web page design enables people with disabilities to use the Internet--and helps everyone to use the Internet better. InfoUse and other key national sources have developed materials on principles of accesible design, along with some specific guidelines.

The Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI), in coordination with other organizations, is pursuing accessibility of the Web through five primary areas of work: technology, guidelines, tools, education and outreach, and research and development. The WAI is a primary resource for how to make your website accessible through current web standards.

InfoUse Web Accessibility Guidelines

InfoUse has produced its own lists of guidelines for designing accessible Web pages for people with all types of disabilities. There are two versions of this document:

"Designing Accessible Websites," by Sylvia Chong (1998). This document, which is an php of the 1996 "Design of Accesible Web Pages", contains information on the accessibility of recent additions to HTML, such as frames, tables, plug-ins and applets.

"Design of Accessible Web Pages," by Jane Berliss, Lewis Kraus, and Susan Stoddard (1996). This document was among the first guidelines available on the topic of accessibility and the World Wide Web.

Other Sites

This section of our site lists other organizations that have been identified as resources on accessible Web page design and computer accessibility for people with disabilities. We will be building this list as we find additional relevant sites.

Trace Research and Development Center - "Designing More Usable Web Sites"
Trace is a national research center on the use of technology by people with disabilities. This link takes you to the section of the Trace site that deals specifically with Web accessibility.
Alliance for Technology Access - Web Accessibility
The Alliance for Technology Access (ATA) is a network of community-based resource centers dedicated to providing information and support services to children and adults with disabilities, and increasing their use of standard, assistive, and information technologies. Centers can be found all across the country.

Preferences for Viewing this Site

A list of suggestions for customizing your browser to take advantage of this site's accessible design.